New Poetry Chapbook by Frank Mundo Released Today by Kattywompus Press

I’m happy to announce that my new poetry chapbook, “Touched by an Anglo,” was officially released today by Kattywompus Press. 

The chapbook is a collection of 26 poems written and published over the last three years. 

Grab your copy today at kattywompuspress.com.

 
“Frank Mundo, author of the widely published essay, “How I Became a Mexican,” wields a knife you’ve seen, straight out of the kitchen drawer but somehow sharper than you remember, to carve the everyday tragedy and comedy of life right down to the bone. Mundo spares neither our sense of horror nor our funny bone, with poems that speak from the page like your childhood best friend peering over your shoulder.”

My other books, The Brubury Tales, Gary, the Four-Eyed Fairy and Other Stories, and Different are available in paperback or for Kindle at Amazon.com

Thank you for your support!!!! 

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Book Review: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

I don’t normally read a lot of nonfiction, except memoirs (which I love), but this book was highly recommended by a friend, so I gave it a shot. Plus, I was intrigued by the book-cover descriptions that referred to the book as a nonfiction novel – which made me think of Capote’s In Cold Blood or something like that – and hopefully not some dry textbook that, while most likely educational and probably edifying to my soul, might be just plain boring.

And, thankfully, I was right, and my friend’s recommendation was spot on.

Yes, Erik Larson offers extensive research to recreate the building of the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, bookending his account a few years before and after this major event in American history. And, yes, this story alone is worthy of an entire book by an author or Larson’s talent. But he did more; he made it fascinating. I was learning (gasp!) and was also thoroughly entertained at the same time.

The story deals with, along with many other topics, genius. The first is Daniel Burnham, the architect who builds the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. And the other is H.H. Holmes, evil but no less a genius, one of the first known serial killers in the United States (with a “murder castle” of horrors) who exploits the fair to find his victims. (There’s a third smaller but still important plotline about Patrick Eugene Prendergast who assassinates popular mayor Carter Harrison, Sr. before the fair is through). We also meet a lot of other geniuses throughout the book from Frederick Olmstead, George R. Davis, G. Brown Goode, Francis David Millet, Ferris (famous Ferris Wheel designer) to Kodak to Buffalo Bill Cody and many, many more, who all helped pulled off this historic event.

There’s not much more to say without spoiling the book, except that I found the first half of the book more educational and the second half of the book more entertaining (and much easier to read). If I have one complaint (a big one), it’s that Larson didn’t discuss Frank Geyer enough – Geyer is the genius detective, from the famed Pinkerton Detective Agency, whose relentless determination in getting his man led to an epic cross-country investigation that ends the book with a much bigger bang than I ever expected. Geyer deserves his own book!

Nonetheless, The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson is an excellent read that makes learning fun.

Books by Frank Mundo

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New Frank Mundo Poem “re: Your Mother” Published Today

My new poem, “re: Your mother“, was published today for aaduna magazine’s National Poetry Month initiative: Four for the 4th.

It’s the second poem posted on the page (Be careful of the first poem. It has some adult language).

Check it out if you have a minute.

The poem is part of my e-pistle series that includes: “re: Your brother“, and more to come.

aaduna is a timeless exploration into words and images – is a globally read, multi-cultural, and diverse online literary and visual arts journal established in 2010. Visit http://www.aaduna.org where they put measurable actions to words.

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“Throwback Cover” for “Gary”

To celebrate almost seven years in publication, I’ve released a “throwback edition” of my short story collection, Gary, The Four-Eyed Fairy and Other Stories (on iTunes only) with the original cover.

Read the stories of JT Glass, an LA rent-a-cop and narrator of The Brubury Tales.

Read it on your iPhone or iPads. Only $1.99!

Check out the cover now.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/gary-four-eyed-fairy-other/id826893004?mt=11

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New Frank Mundo Poem Published Today at Beautiful Losers Magazine

I have a new poem called “The Upsell Artist” published today at Beautiful Losers Magazine, a great little lit mag I really like.

The subject matter is a bit racier than my usual stuff, so be warned.

If you want to check it out, please visit Beautiful Losers Magazine.

Here’s the URL if the link doesn’t work –> https://medium.com/beautiful-losers/the-upsell-artist-by-frank-mundo-67b749cbfa73#.xalsj7o31

Be sure to “like” it and share it if you can, so they invite me back in the future.

Thank you for your support. It means a lot to me.

Oh, I have another new poem coming in April — a National Poetry Month feature for aaduna magazine.

Stayed tuned for another post with more info as we approach April.

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Transforming Grief: Writing and Reading as tools of healing with guest Frank Mundo

Day 37 of 44 days of Transforming Grief: Writing and Reading as a tool of healing with Guest Frank Mundo

I was on a radio series a few years ago about getting beyond grief. A book is being created based on those experiences. You can learn more on this video or just listen to the show at the links below.

Facebook video

Radio Show Link:

30 days of writing:

Author page on Amazon

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POETRY VIDEO: Frank Mundo Reading a Sestina at Occidental College

I was invited to read poetry at Occidental College a few months back. I’m not sure if this link will work, but here is a video of me reading a sestina I wrote for my brother called, “Waste of Shame

If you want to read the poem, it was published in Angel City Review Issue 3.

According to poets.org, the sestina follows a strict pattern of the repetition of the initial six end-words of the first stanza through the remaining five six-line stanzas, culminating in a three-line envoi. The lines may be of any length, though in its initial incarnation, the sestina followed a syllabic restriction. The form is as follows, where each numeral indicates the stanza position and the letters represent end-words:

1. ABCDEF
2. FAEBDC
3. CFDABE
4. ECBFAD
5. DEACFB
6. BDFECA
7. (envoi) ECA or ACE

The envoi, sometimes known as the tornada, must also include the remaining three end-words, BDF, in the course of the three lines so that all six recurring words appear in the final three lines. In place of a rhyme scheme, the sestina relies on end-word repetition to effect a sort of rhyme.

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